Sajid Javid resigns as chancellor amid cabinet reshuffle

Sajid Javid
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Sajid Javid has resigned as chancellor amidst a post-Brexit cabinet reshuffle being carried out by UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Former Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said he resigned from the post after he was asked to fire his team of aides. Javid rejected the order, saying “no self-respecting minister” could accept such a condition.

Javid, who had been due to deliver his first Budget in four weeks’ time, has been replaced by Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak, who was a junior housing minister just seven months ago.

Javid has served as Home Secretary since April 2018 before being appointed as chancellor when Johnson became prime minister in July 2019. His resignation follows rumors the he is having tensions with the prime minister’s senior adviser Dominic Cummings.

A source close to Javid said: “The prime minister said he had to fire all his special advisers and replace them with Number 10 special advisers to make it one team. The chancellor said no self-respecting minister would accept those terms.”

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The 39-year-old Sunak, who graduated from Winchester College and Oxford University, was elected MP for Richmond, North Yorkshire in 2015, replacing Conservative leader William Hague.

He served as a housing minister in 2018, before being promoted to chief secretary to the Treasury last July. Sunak said he was “delighted to be appointed” chancellor and had “a lot to get on with”.

In reaction to Javid’s resignation, Labour’s shadow chancellor John McDonnell said: “This must be a historical record with the government in crisis after just over two months in power.”

“Dominic Cummings has clearly won the battle to take absolute control of the Treasury and install his stooge as chancellor,” McDonnell added.

Other movements in the cabinet reshuffling included the dismissals of Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith and Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom, as well as Housing Minister Esther McVey and Environment Secretary Theresa Villiers.

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