EPA approves the use of Lysol’s disinfectant sprays as Covid-19 protection

EPA approves the use of Lysol's disinfectant sprays as Covid-19 protection
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The US Environmental Protection Agency or EPA approves the use of Lysol’s disinfectant sprays as protection against Covid-19.

EPA has approved the Lysol Disinfectant Spray and Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist. These are the first disinfectant products that EPA affirmed as effective against SARS-COV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19.

The agency reportedly tested the Lysol disinfectant sprays in a laboratory. Results showed they were able the virus disappeared on surfaces within two minutes of use.

“The EPA’s approval recognizes that using Lysol Disinfectant Spray can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on hard, non-porous surfaces. In the face of the pandemic, Lysol continues to work with a wide range of scientific and health experts to educate the public on the importance of hygiene,” Rahul Kadyan, Executive Vice President of Hygiene for Reckitt Benckiser, Lysol’s parent company, said in a statement.

Americans hoarded cleaning products like Lysol disinfectant sprays, wipes, and hand sanitizer at the peak of the coronavirus pandemic in March. British manufacturer Reckitt Benckiser announced massive sales growth in the first quarter as the public continued to buy disinfectants as stay-at-home orders were imposed nationwide.

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“As a global leader in health and hygiene products, we must be clear that under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion or any other route),” the company said in a statement in April. “As with all products, our disinfectant and hygiene products should only be used as intended and in line with usage guidelines. Please read the label and safety information.”

No to internal use

Reckitt Benckiser previously made headlines when it discouraged any internal use of its products to treat the coronavirus. This statement came after President Donald Trump suggested that injecting disinfectants can possibly protect people from coronavirus.

The US president said: “And then I see the disinfectant where it knocks it out in one minute. Is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning … it would be interesting to check that.”

“It sounds interesting to me,” Trump added.

Trump faced backlash over his statements as disinfectants are hazardous substances that even external exposure can be dangerous to the skin, eyes and respiratory system. Moreover, they can be poisonous if ingested.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent at CNN, quickly disputed the statement. Dr. Gupta said: “He also said it needs to be studied. Actually, it doesn’t. I mean we know the answer to this one.”

He pointed out: “I think everybody would know that that would be dangerous and counter-productive.”

Meanwhile, the company said it issued the warning following “recent speculation and social media activity.” It pointed out that its products should only be “used as intended and in line with usage guidelines.”

In a statement, Reckitt Benckiser explained: “As a global leader in health and hygiene products, we must be clear that under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion or any other route).”

“We have a responsibility in providing consumers with access to accurate, up-to-date information as advised by leading public health experts,” the company added.

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